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Commercial - Chillers

A chilled-water applied system uses chilled water to transport heat energy between the airside, chillers and the outdoors. These systems are more commonly found in large HVAC installations, given their efficiency advantages and or where there are process cooling loads or the need for closer temperature control.

The components of the chiller (evaporator, compressor, an air- or water-cooled condenser, and expansion device) are often manufactured, assembled, and tested as a complete package by the manufacturer. Mechanical Air Service can also fabricate a custom chiller for unique applications as well.

Chillers will typically have either an air cooled condenser or a water cooled condenser with a cooling tower associated with it. The water cooled versions are typically used in larger applications, however, many cities impose significant sewer fees and these related costs as well as the additional expense of maintaining the cooling tower and related pumps must be taken into consideration.

While water-cooled chillers are rarely installed as separate components, some air cooled chillers offer the flexibility of separating the components for installation in different locations. This allows our design engineers to position the components where they best serve the space, acoustic, and maintenance requirements of the building owner.

Another benefit of a chilled-water system is refrigerant containment. Having the refrigeration equipment installed in a central location minimizes the potential for refrigerant leaks, simplifies refrigerant handling practices, and typically makes it easier to contain a leak if one does occur.

Factors affecting the decision to select a Chilled Water system include:

  • Installed Cost
  • System flexibility
  • Part load energy efficiencies
  • Space availability

   
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